Can Dogs Eat Prunes?

can dogs eat prunes

We often eat prunes because we have a bad stomach or are feeling a bit backed up. Prunes will usually help restore our bowel function, so you might think, how about dogs? Can dogs eat prunes as well?

Can Dogs Eat Prunes?

No, it is not recommended to give your dog prunes. They are not toxic and if they have eaten a single prune, there should be no problems. If they have had a few prunes, then there might be some digestive problems and maybe some diarrhea or vomiting.

Prunes do not work the same as they do for humans, they do not solve constipation.

If you think of it like this, prunes are not found in nature, so your dog would not eat them if they found them in the wild themselves. Their bodies are not accustomed to prunes and with their stomach being sensitive, it is just asking for trouble.

prunes

What Is In Prunes?

What makes prunes and prune juice effective when it comes to humans is the content of sorbitol and fiber in them.

Prunes are also good for reducing inflammation and helping lower the risk of some chronic diseases. This is because of the high amounts of polyphenol antioxidants in it. This only works for humans and not dogs.

Even though prunes come from plums, they are not the same type of thing. Plums that are used to create dried up prunes are much higher in fiber then your normal store-bought plums. The reason this is done is so they can help people with constipation problems.

You may think, oh well if plums are not as high in fiber then prunes, then I will just feed my dog a plum. No, that is not how it works. Plums are still high in sugar, along with the pit inside, which can cause digestive obstruction. Not forgetting that the pit contains cyanide, which is deadly to dogs.

When plums are dried out, the flavors of the plum get a lot stronger and the fiber contents become higher as well.

can dogs eat prunes

Sugar and Fiber

You know prunes are high in fiber, but what you might not know is that prunes are high in sugar as well. That type of combination could cause your dog’s digestive system some problems and also cause some intestinal problems.

As mentioned above though, if your dog has only eaten one prune, then they should be fine. This is only if your dog has eaten a few.

Dogs do not need a higher fiber diet, only if they have been recommended by their veterinarian. Which would have told you what they can and cannot eat, and prunes would have been on the cannot list.

Prunes will usually contain around 3.9g of sugar and for a little thing it can be easy for your dog to have a couple, which can easily add up. Because of this, we do not recommend you feed your dog any prunes. As the high amount of sugar can cause problems with their health.

Feeding your dog a high sugar content diet will result in them gaining weight and then diabetes. Which can then lead to more serious health condition such as, pancreatitis, high blood pressure joint issues, and as mentioned diabetes.

Can Dogs Eat Prune Juice?

No, they cannot, just like prunes it is not recommended that you feed your dog any prune juice. A good general rule of thumb is not to give your dog any other liquid except for water.

Water keeps your dog hydrated. If they are just drinking something else, they will not have much attention for their water, which will cause dehydration.

can dogs eat prune juice

What To Do If My Dog Has Eaten Too Many Prunes?

If your dog has eaten several prunes or suspect that they have sneaked a couple, then some symptoms to keep an eye out for are:

  • Diarrhea
  • Vomiting
  • Bloating
  • Loss of appetite
  • Cramping

If you find your dog to have any of these symptoms, then you should call your local veterinarian straight away. They will be able to give you the best-guided advice on how to help your dog and be able to keep your dog as comfortable as possible.

Please note if you are generally worried about your dog’s health, then you do not have to wait until you see the signs above. Take them straight to the veterinarian if you are genuinely worried, as it is better to be safe than sorry.

It is also to be noted that some prunes may still have the pit inside, so you need to be very cautious. Pits have cyanide inside, which can cause poisoning. Along with causing a blockage in the digestive system.

What Other Options Are There, Except For Prunes?

The main reason why people try and feed their dog prunes is because they are having constipation.

As mentioned above, this is not the solution to that. If your dog is having constipation problems and looks like he is struggling, then you should contact your local veterinarian for advice. They will be able to give you the best advice on your dog personally, especially if they are on medication as well.

If that is not a choice, maybe it is the holiday season, then a good option is mashed up pumpkin. Pumpkin is actually a super-food, that not many people know about. Pumpkin is found in some higher-end dog food and is also high in fiber which can help your dog constipation issue.

Let us please state that you should not be buying any over the counter remedies or herbal remedies that are for humans, this is the same case as prunes.

Just because it is good for humans, it does not mean it is good for dogs, especially pharmaceutical remedies. These could have a deadly effect on your little loved one.

prunes

Conclusion

Prunes are not to be fed to dogs, even though they are not toxic, they can have other side effects.

The main reason people only think about feeding prunes to their dog is because they are feeling constipated or they have swallowed something they should not have, and they are wanting it to pass through quicker.

Both options are not valid reasons for you to be feeding your dog prunes.

If your dog is suffering from constipation, then you should always make sure their water bowl is full. Keeping your dog hydrated is important with constipation. If the constipation carries on, then you should contact your local veterinarian for advice. Always follow your veterinarian’s advice over everything, even if they advise you to give your dog prunes.

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